होम Culture / History The Untold Story of Maluti: Discovering the 108 Ancient Temples in Jharkhand

The Untold Story of Maluti: Discovering the 108 Ancient Temples in Jharkhand

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Untold Story Of Maluti, ‘Gupt Kashi’ Of Jharkhand | Know 7 Interesting Facts About Village With 108 Temples

Did you know that there is a village in Jharkhand with a population of only 2,500 to 3,000 people, but is home to 108 ancient temples? This village, Maluti, is situated near Shikaripara town in the Dumka district and covers an area of 406 hectares. Maluti is a historically significant place in India with numerous religious and architectural heritage structures.

Despite its historic significance, it is still not a popular tourist destination. Maluti was brought to the public’s attention during the Republic Day parade in New Delhi in 2015. The tableau of Maluti’s 108 temples and beautiful ponds was presented during the parade, and even then-US President Barack Obama, who was the chief guest, was impressed by the village’s beauty. Here are 7 interesting facts about the village of Maluti:

Maluti has 108 temples and beautiful ponds. Despite its small population, Maluti boasts 108 magnificent ancient temples. There were originally 108 ponds as well, but the number has reduced to 65 over the years. The maximum number of temples are dedicated to Lord Shiva.

Maluti’s rich historical heritage has attracted the attention of the government and tourists. The tableau of Maluti was selected for the second prize at the 2015 Republic Day parade. This caught the attention of the government and helped bring the village into the spotlight for tourists.

The Indian government is making efforts to preserve Maluti’s heritage. Prime Minister Narendra Modi has shown personal interest in bringing Maluti to the forefront as a historical and religious heritage site. With the help of the central government, construction work worth Rs 13.67 crore began to preserve these heritage sites. The Jharkhand Tourism Department is now preparing to start the second phase of the restoration works soon. It is important to preserve these heritage sites while minimizing interference with the ancient style and structure of these temples.

Maluti’s temples are of terracotta form and reflect ancient architecture. The temples built in Maluti are of terracotta form and bear the imprint of ancient architecture from Chala, Bengal, and Orissa. These temples are a testament to the cultural and artistic legacy of India.

Maluti was declared a tax-free land by the then Muslim ruler, Sultan Ala-ud-din Hussain Shah. Ancient inscriptions reveal that Maluti was once known as the ‘Land of Gods.’ Realizing the religious significance of Maluti, the then Muslim ruler Sultan Ala-ud-din Hussain Shah (1493-1519) declared this area a tax-free land.

The story of 108 temples in Maluti is quite interesting. When Bengal was ruled by Sultan Ala-ud-din Hussain Shah between 1494-1519, he had a penchant for keeping eagles. One day, one of the Sultan’s favorite eagles went missing, and he announced a huge reward for anyone who could find the bird. A youth named Basant Rai found the eagle and was rewarded with the land of Maluti and the surrounding areas. After owning the land, Basant Rai became known as Raja Baj Basant. His descendant, Raja Rakhad Chandra Rai, devoted his time to religious pursuits, rituals, and ceremonies. He built the first 24 temples in the village.

Maluti’s temples have intricate carvings and beautiful designs. The temples in Maluti are renowned for their intricate terracotta carvings and beautiful designs. The temples are built in various styles, including Baidyanath, Mahadev, Annapurna, and Kali. These temples have been standing tall for centuries and continue to attract devotees and tourists alike.

The people of Maluti are proud of their village’s religious heritage. The people of Maluti are proud of their village’s rich religious heritage and continue to take care of the temples to this day. The village is also known as ‘Gupt Kashi’ due to the presence of so many temples. The people of the village hold an annual fair called the Maluti Mela in honor of the deity Maluti Bhagwati. During the fair, people from neighboring villages come to Maluti to pay their respects to the deity and enjoy the festivities.

Maluti’s temples are a unique blend of Hindu and Islamic architecture. Maluti’s temples are a unique blend of Hindu and Islamic architecture. The influence of Bengal and Orissa can also be seen in the architecture. The unique blend of architectural styles is a testament to the region’s diverse cultural heritage and history.

Maluti’s temples have survived numerous invasions and attacks. Maluti’s temples have survived numerous invasions and attacks over the centuries. During the reign of the Mughals, Maluti was attacked several times, but the temples remained untouched. The people of the village believe that the deities in the temples protect them from harm.

The restoration work in Maluti is being carried out with great care and precision. The restoration work in Maluti is being carried out with great care and precision to preserve the heritage structures. The government is taking measures to ensure that the restoration work is carried out while maintaining the ancient style and structure of the temples. The restoration work is being carried out in two phases, with the first phase completed in 2021.

Maluti has a lot of potential as a tourist destination. Despite its rich history and cultural heritage, Maluti is still not a popular tourist destination. With the restoration work underway and efforts to promote Maluti as a tourist destination, there is great potential for the village to become a popular destination for tourists who are interested in exploring India’s religious and architectural heritage.

In conclusion, Maluti is a unique village with a rich history and cultural heritage. The village’s temples are a testament to the region’s diverse cultural influences, and the people of the village take great pride in preserving their religious heritage. With the restoration work underway, it is hoped that Maluti will soon become a popular tourist destination and attract visitors from all over the world.

FAQ:

What is the significance of Maluti?

Maluti is a historically significant place in India with numerous religious and architectural heritage structures. The village boasts 108 ancient temples and beautiful ponds.

How many temples are there in Maluti?

Maluti is home to 108 ancient temples. Originally, there were 108 ponds as well, but the number has reduced to 65 over the years. The maximum number of temples are dedicated to Lord Shiva.

Why is Maluti not a popular tourist destination?

Despite its historic significance, Maluti is still not a popular tourist destination. However, the Indian government is making efforts to bring the village into the spotlight for tourists.

What is the story behind the 108 temples in Maluti?

According to ancient legend, when Bengal was ruled by Sultan Ala-ud-din Hussain Shah between 1494-1519, he had a penchant for keeping eagles. One day, one of the Sultan’s favourite eagles went missing, and he announced a huge reward for anyone who could find the bird. A youth named Basant Rai found the eagle and was rewarded with the land of Maluti and the surrounding areas. After owning the land, Basant Rai became known as Raja Baj Basant. His descendant, Raja Rakhad Chandra Rai, devoted his time to religious pursuits, rituals, and ceremonies. He built the first 24 temples in the village.

What efforts is the Indian government making to preserve Maluti’s heritage?

Prime Minister Narendra Modi has shown personal interest in bringing Maluti to the forefront as a historical and religious heritage site. With the help of the central government, construction work worth Rs 13.67 crore began to preserve these heritage sites. The Jharkhand Tourism Department is now preparing to start the second phase of the restoration works soon. It is important to preserve these heritage sites while minimizing interference with the ancient style and structure of these temples.

What is the architectural style of the temples in Maluti?

The temples built in Maluti are of terracotta form and bear the imprint of ancient architecture from Chala, Bengal, and Orissa. These temples are a testament to the cultural and artistic legacy of India.

Who declared Maluti a tax-free land?

Ancient inscriptions reveal that Maluti was once known as the ‘Land of Gods.’ Realizing the religious significance of Maluti, the then Muslim ruler Sultan Ala-ud-din Hussain Shah (1493-1519) declared this area a tax-free land.

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